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Published By United Press International
Dead Nevada man's home filled with gold

CARSON CITY, Nev., Sept. 16 (UPI) -- A Nevada recluse left behind a stunning treasure when he died this spring -- officials say they discovered $7 million in gold bars and coins in his home.

Walter Samasko Jr. died in his Carson City home in May. His body wasn't found until June after his neighbors complained of the odor emanating from the house. That's when the gold was found stored in his house and garage, the Las Vegas Sun reported Sunday.

Carson City Clerk Alan Glover used a wheelbarrow to schlep the gold, which included coins from Mexico, England, Austria and South Africa dating to 1872, to his truck for the trip to a safe location.

The newspaper said Samasko hadn't worked since 1968 and was living off his investments, which included stock accounts of $140,000 and $25,000.

"Nobody had any clue he was hoarding the gold," Glover said.

Samasko, whose age wasn't reported, had no will and did not appear to have any close relatives, though a first cousin, substitute teacher Arlene Magdanz, was tracked down in San Rafael, Calif.

"Oh, my God. Oh, my God," she told a lawyer who was the first to give her the word about the treasure.

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Strange lights really parachute team

FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla., Sept. 16 (UPI) -- Strange lights in the skies over Fort Lauderdale, Fla., weren't from a plane in trouble but the U.S. Army Golden Knights parachute team, police said.

The Golden Knights parachuted onto Fort Lauderdale Beach Saturday as part of the city's Stars, Strips and Sun salute to the military, the South Florida Sun Sentinel reported.

But their lights had some people wondering otherwise. Dispatchers at Fort Lauderdale Police Department said they got several calls from concerned residents.

The Sun Sentinel said it took several call from people wondering whether a plane crashed into the ocean.

~~~

Week honors unmarried people

WASHINGTON, Sept. 16 (UPI) -- Forty-four percent of the U.S. adult population was single in 2011, the U.S. Census Bureau said Sunday, the first day of Unmarried and Single Americans Week.

The idea behind setting aside the third week in September to honor singles and unmarried people began in Ohio in the 1980s, the Census Bureau said in a release on statistics based on 2011.

Of the unmarried U.S. adult residents, 53 percent were women and 47 percent wee men, data indicated.

The percentage of unmarried U.S. adults who had never been married is 62 percent, while 24 percent were divorced and 14 percent were widowed, the Census Bureau said.

The bureau said there were 89 unmarried men for every 100 unmarried women in the United States and that 55 million households were maintained by unmarried men, about 46 percent of households nationwide.

In households with children, 13.6 million unmarried parents were in such living arrangements. Of this total, 10.0 million were unmarried mothers, 1.7 million were unmarried fathers and 1.9 million were unmarried couples with at least one shared child.

The number of people who lived alone in 2011 was 33 million, 28 percent of all households, the Census Bureau said.

The bureau said there were 6.8 million households with unmarried partners. Of that total, 593,000 were same-sex households.

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Group phone-gaming record still intact

ROSEVILLE, Minn., Sept. 16 (UPI) -- The 240 people who showed up to play mobile phone games in suburban St. Paul, Minn., this weekend didn't set a world record but said they had fun anyway.

The communal game-playing event in Roseville Saturday fell 76 people short of the Guinness World Record of 316 set in Birmingham, England, back in April, the St. Paul Pioneer Press reported.

"It was really close," Guinness official Amanda Mochan said. "Unofficially, it's the largest mobile phone gaming party in the U.S. But that's not recognized by Guinness."

Carter Behr of Lakeville, a 10-year-old participant in the Roseville Visitors Association-sponsored event, said he had been "kind of bragging" to his friends about being part of the attempt at setting the record and was pleased with his official T-shirt commemorating it.

"Even if we don't break the record, we've got proof we were here on the back," Carter said, pointing to his shirt.

~~~
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Tour de France concludes in Paris
Race winner Bradley Wiggins of Great Britain (C) stands between second place finisher Christopher Froome of Great Britain (L) and third place finisher Vincenzo Nibali of Italy on the presentation podium following the final stage of the Tour de France in Paris on July 22, 2012. Wiggins of Great Britain became that country's first ever overall winner of the Tour de France. UPI/David Silpa